X

Retrieve your login details

Enter your email address below and we'll send you an email with a link reset your password

loading..

YOUR FAVOURITES

You need to have an account and be logged in to be able to add and manage your list of favourites. or create an account

You haven’t viewed any of our resources yet. To start exploring them now please see our full listing here

Sikhism: The Five Ks

A young Sikh explains the importance and meaning of the five symbols that Sikhs wear – the Five Ks.

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices - Sikhism- The Sikh initiation ceremony (Amrit Sanskar) -This includes the meaning and importance of the Khalsa and the five Ks, and the different perspectives of sahajdhari and amritdhari Sikhs.

2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Sikhism - Core beliefs, teachings and practices - Practices - Ceremonies  Naming a Sikh child – meaning and significance  The significance and use of the names Singh and Kaur  Sikh initiation ceremony (Amrit Sanskar) – importance and significance in a Sikh’s life and consideration given to the perspective of non-khalsa Sikhs  Meaning of the main features of the initiation ceremony  Wearing of the 5k’s and their symbolism and significance – kesh, kangha, kirpan, kara, kacch.

Component 3 (Route A) -Option 5: Sikhism - Practices: Ceremonies - The different views of khalsa and non-khalsa (sahaj-dhari) Sikhs towards Khalsa and the Five K's

Holy Cribs: The Five Ks

Arvinda: People who want to show their commitment to Sikhi go through a special ceremony called the Amrit Sanskar to become a member of the Khalsa, which means brotherhood. They also wear five symbols which are called the 5 Ks, because they all begin with K in Punjabi, the language the Sikh Gurus would have spoken. This tradition was started by Guru Gobind Singh ji, who wanted his people to stand up for what they believed. To declare to the world that they were Sikh and proud of it. The first K is called Kesh, which means uncut hair. This symbolises that Sikhs should respect God's perfect creation and never harm it. Men keep their hair tied up neatly in a turban and will let their beard grow. Some women choose to wear a turban as well, although they don't have to. Guru Gobind Singh ji wanted the Sikhs to have respect for each other and respect for themselves. So he told them to carry a Kangha, a comb as a reminder that they should keep themselves clean and tidy at all times. The Kara is a steel bangle that Sikhs wear on their right wrist if they're right handed and on their left wrist if they are left handed. They still remind Sikhs that they should be strong and the circular shape reminds them that there is one eternal God. The Kara is also a reminder to Sikhs that they should not do anything wrong. So if their hand stretches out to steal something or hit someone, the Kara is there to make them think again. The Kachera are, and there is no easy way to put this, underwear.

Back when Guru Gobind Singh ji was alive, not everyone bothered to wear underwear. They might wear a loose wrap or even a long shirt. But the Guru said the Sikhs should cover themselves decently by wearing shorts with a drawstring waist. It is another symbol of self respect and respect for other people. The Kirpan is probably the most misunderstood of the 5 Ks. Originally, it was a long, sharp, single edged sword that Sikhs would carry so they could defend themselves and others from persecution. These days, Sikhs usually carry a very small, short and blunt Kirpan that would be of little use as a weapon. But the symbolism is the same. Sikhs should be ready at all times to stand up for what they believe is right and stand up for the defenseless. This doesn't mean literally fighting, although it might. It's more about standing up for what is right and speaking out against what is wrong. Guru Gobind Singh ji knew that it is important for Sikhs to have freedom to express themselves, to be proud of who they are and what they believe.

Sikhism: The Five Ks

Video length - 03.08
Published date - Apr 2023
Keystage(s) - 3 and 4
Downloadable resources

Azeen welcomes TrueTube to the East London Mosque and we’re given the full tour. Azeen talks about the features of a traditional mosque and shows us how Muslims pray.

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices – Beliefs and teachings - Islam - Salah and its significance: how and why Muslims pray including times, directions, ablution (wudu), movements (rak’ahs) and recitations; salah in the home and mosque and elsewhere; Friday prayer: Jummah; key differences in the practice of salah in Sunni and Shi’a Islam, and different Muslim views about the importance of prayer. Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah including origins, including the Ka’aba at Makkah,

Area of Study 3 – Islam - Section 1: Muslim Beliefs -Salah as one of the Five Pillars, including reference to Surah 15: 98–99 and 29:45: the nature, history, significance and purpose of Salah for Sunni and Shi’a Muslims, including different ways of understanding them; how Salah is performed including ablution, times, directions, movements and recitations, in the home and mosque and Jummah prayer.

Component Group 1–Practices - Islam - Public acts of worship - Salah as direct communication with Allah. The importance of practices - Islam as a way of life, lived in total submission to Allah • The importance of the Five Pillars of Islam to Sunni Muslims • The meaning of the Five Pillars: •• Shahadah: sincerely reciting the Muslim profession of faith •• Salat: performing ritual prayers in the proper way five times each day •• Zakat/Zakah: paying an alms (or charity) tax to benefit the poor and the needy •• Sawm: fasting during the month of Ramadan •• Hajj: pilgrimage to Mecca • The analogy of the house and pillars

2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Part A Islam - Core beliefs, teachings and practices - Practices - The Five Pillars of Sunni Islam -Prayer/ Salat  Adhan call to prayer, praying at mosque and Friday Jummah prayer (Qur'an 15:9899, 29:45)  Praying at home, private prayer (Du'ah)  The preparations and intention for prayer: wudu and niyyah  The significance and symbolism of the different prayer positions that make a rakat (sequence of prayer) Obligatory Acts  Shahadah: the Muslim profession of faith in Allah and the prophet Muhammad; occasions when the Shahadah is recited, e.g. aqiqah ceremony, conversion to Islam  Zakat: paying an alms (or charity) tax to benefit others, what zakat tax may be used for, and additional charity (saddaqah)  Sawm: Fasting during the month of Ramadan. How and why Muslims fast during Ramadan and rules about halal and haram diet (Qur'an 2:183)

2.3 Component 3 (Route A) - Option 3: Islam - The Five Pillars of Sunni Islam: practices in Britain and elsewhere - Salah: the practices of prayer in Islam in the mosque and at home, including Jummah prayer: Qur'an 15:98-99, Qur'an 29:45

Holy Cribs – Mosque

Azeen:    Welcome to the East London Mosque. My name is Azeen. I'm a Muslim. My religion is called Islam. This is where I come to worship Allah, which is what we call God. Come on in. I'll show you around. The inside of the building is always kept clean as a sign of respect to Allah. So the first thing I do is take off my shoes and leave them in these racks here. Girls and women should also cover their heads with a scarf called a hijab inside the mosque. A lot of boys and men like to wear a little cap like this, called a topi. As well as keeping the building clean, we like to keep ourselves clean too. So before I pray, I come in here to do a special wash called wudu. So I sit in front of one of these taps and I wash my hands, face and feet three times. Now I'm ready to go into the main prayer hall. The first thing you notice, there isn't much in here. This building is called a mosque or masjid, which both mean a place of prostration. Prostration is when someone bows down with their forehead right on the floor. And all Muslims do this when we pray, as a sign of complete obedience to Allah. So a prayer hall just needs to be a big open space where lots of people can sit on the floor to say their prayers.

 

There's nice thick carpet so we're comfortable when praying and there's these lines across it, which we stand on in rows. This gives us enough space to prostrate so we don't bump into the people in front. Wherever we are in the world, all Muslims face the city of Makkah in Saudi Arabia when we pray. That's because the first ever building used to worship Allah, called the Ka'bah, is in Makkah. It's a symbol of togetherness that all Muslims everywhere are concentrating on the same holy place and praying to Allah. The direction of the Ka'bah in Makkah is called the qibla and you can work out using the compass. But here in the mosque there's an easier way. This archway is called the mihrab and it's always in the wall facing the qibla. The person who leads the prayers in a mosque is called an imam, and he'll stand in front of the mihrab to say the prayers out loud. The mihrab reflects his voice back into the room so that everyone can hear him, because, of course, he'll be facing Makkah too. Muslims pray five times a day just before sunrise, just after midday, mid-afternoon, just after sunset and at night before going to bed. I could do that anywhere, as long as I'm in a clean place or have somewhere to lay down a prayer mat. But lots of people like to come here to pray with other people. About quarter of an hour before the prayer is due to start, a man called a muezzin will call people to prayer by reciting the adhan.

 

In Muslim countries, this could be heard from loudspeakers outside so the local people know to stop what they're doing and get over to the mosque. Traditionally, and it's still done in some places, the muezzin will climb the stairs to the top of a tower called a minaret to give the call. Minarets are still a common feature of mosques, even though the muezzin often uses a microphone these days. In the UK, you usually only hear the adhan inside the building. But here at East London Mosque, the daytime calls are broadcasted outside as well. Just before the prayer starts, there's another call which is called the iqamah. On Fridays, people make a special effort to come to the midday prayers because the imam does a special talk called a khutbah, and he'll do it from this platform here, which is called a minbar. Above the prayer hall, traditional mosques have a dome. This helps the imam's voice carry to all parts of the room and in hot countries allows the hot air to rise to keep everyone else cool. And some say that the dome is a reminder of heaven above us, and they are often most beautifully decorated. You won't see any pictures of people or animals inside the mosque, because when Islam started in Arabia hundreds of years ago, most people worshipped statues and pictures. So Muslims wanted to show they were different because they worshipped Allah who couldn't be seen. So instead, mosques are often decorated with passages from the Qur'an, which is a holy book, is written in a very old form of Arabic, which looks beautiful when written out like this. The art of beautiful writing is called calligraphy, and some of the oldest and most beautiful calligraphy in the world is in Arabic. You might also see geometrical patterns like geometry in maths. These are amazingly complicated designs made up of different shapes, and they are often symmetrical. Or there are sometimes patterns that look like leaves and branches twining around each other and over the building. That sort of design is called arabesque. Men and women pray separately in the mosque, so they are concentrating on Allah and not on each other. Sometimes the women will have an area at the back of the main prayer hall or a gallery, or like we've got here: the women have their own separate room. Education and learning are very important to Muslims. So we have a classroom here where I come to a madrassah, that's school in Arabic. I'm learning Arabic so that I can read the Qur'an in its original form and not just a translation. And that's my mosque, out here you can see the dome and minaret standing proudly as part of our community. Thanks for coming, bye.

Holy Cribs: The Mosque

Video length - 07.33
Published date - Mar 2023
Keystage(s) - 2, 3 and 4
Downloadable resources

The Only Way is Keeping Up With Esther – The story of Esther and Mordecai is retold – in the style of an OTT reality TV show.

King Ahasuerus has grown tired of Queen Vashti and has her thrown out of the palace. He gives the courtier Haman responsibility for finding him a new wife and Haman quickly identifies Esther as perfect. Esther’s guardian is her cousin, Mordecai, who insists on going to the palace with Esther, while warning her not to reveal their Jewish faith. When Haman discovers their identity he convinces the King to have all Jews in the land killed – and Esther must find a way to save her people.

Suitable for teaching KS1 / KS2.

For teachers’ notes and more: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/assemblies-ks1-ks2-esther-mordecai-haman-purim/zsfq8hv

This film is from the the assemblies collection on BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/primary-school-assemblies-collective-worship-ks1-ks2/zmsnm39

As this film is embedded you will not be able to download it.

The TrueTube and CTVC team made this film for BBC Teach, so for more resources go to BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach

The Bible Stories series was commissioned by BBC Teach and produced by CTVC/TrueTube.

A film by Alastair Collinson.

The Only Way is Keeping Up With Esther

Video length - 05.41
Published date - Oct 2021
Keystage(s) - 1 and 2
Downloadable resources

Samson – The Judge – The story of ‘Samson and Delilah’ is re-imagined as a blockbuster superhero movie. Samson’s great strength is a gift from God, but Samson has been ignoring his gift. Then, when his wife is killed by the Philistine oppressors, Samson assumes his alter-ego – The Judge – and goes in search of revenge.

The Philistines send Delilah – their top agent – to trap Samson and are able to capture him after Delilah has learnt that Samson’s hair is the secret of his strength. But Samson has one final judgement to make.

Suitable for teaching KS1 / KS2.

For teachers’ notes and more: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/assemblies-ks1-ks2-samson-and-delilah-the-judge/z7dstrd

This film is from the the assemblies collection on BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/primary-school-assemblies-collective-worship-ks1-ks2/zmsnm39

As this film is embedded you will not be able to download it.

The TrueTube and CTVC team made this film for BBC Teach, so for more resources go to BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach

The Bible Stories series was commissioned by BBC Teach and produced by CTVC/TrueTube.

Samson – The Judge

Video length - 06.12
Published date - Oct 2021
Keystage(s) - 1 and 2
Downloadable resources

The Kitchen Miracle-Maker (Jesus Feeds the 5000) – The story of ‘Jesus Feeds the 5000’ is retold – with a twist. Mary and Mark are hosts of something reminiscent of a modern-day cookery programme. Jesus and his disciples take on the challenge to provide food for the 5000 people assembled, but with only two small fish and five loaves available it’s clear that another miracle is called for.

Various attempts are made to create delicious dishes – delicate bite-sized sandwiches, Mediterranean grilled-fish salad, golden fishcakes – but when the time is up the results are far from miraculous. Then Jesus blesses the food and shares it among the crowd. There’s plenty for everyone – and there’s even some left over. It’s a miracle!

Suitable for teaching KS1 / KS2.

For teachers’ notes and more: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/assemblies-ks1-ks2-jesus-feeds-the-5000-loaves-fishes/zrdstrd

This film is from the the assemblies collection on BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/primary-school-assemblies-collective-worship-ks1-ks2/zmsnm39

As this film is embedded you will not be able to download it.

The TrueTube and CTVC team made this film for BBC Teach, so for more resources go to BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach

The Bible Stories series was commissioned by BBC Teach and produced by CTVC/TrueTube.

The Kitchen Miracle-Maker (Jesus Feeds the 5000)

Video length - 04.41
Published date - Oct 2021
Keystage(s) - 1 and 2
Downloadable resources

Living Your Best Life (Jesus Heals a Man with Leprosy) – The story of ‘Jesus Heals a Man with Leprosy’ is retold – with a twist.

Benjamin lives in the Galilean village of Capernaum and has leprosy. He is also appearing on the reality TV make-over show called ‘Living Your Best Life’. Benjamin learns from the presenter – Joanna, the Make-Over Queen – that Jesus is due to visit Capernaum the following day. Benjamin duly kneels before Jesus asking to be cured. Later, joined by Joanna once more, Benjamin describes how his life has changed. But what has made the greatest impression on him is the compassion and acceptance of Jesus.

Suitable for teaching KS1 / KS2.

For teachers’ notes, assembly framework and more:https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/assemblies-ks1-ks2-jesus-heals-a-man-with-leprosy-living-your-best-life/zgh9g7h

This film is from the the assemblies collection on BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/primary-school-assemblies-collective-worship-ks1-ks2/zmsnm39

As this film is embedded you will not be able to download it.

The TrueTube and CTVC team made this film for BBC Teach, so for more resources go to BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach

The Bible Stories series was commissioned by BBC Teach and produced by CTVC/TrueTube.

Living Your Best Life (Jesus Heals a Man with Leprosy)

Video length - 5.04
Published date - Oct 2021
Keystage(s) - 1 and 2
Downloadable resources

The Demon’s Head – The Collector welcomes you to his House of Horrible Things to tell the gruesome story of the demon Mahishashura, his confrontation with the Goddess Durga, and how he came to lose his head.

A story for the Hindu festival of Navaratri, narrated by Tim McInnerny.

Animation by Ceiren Bell.

CREDITS

Nominated for the Animation Award at the Children’s BAFTAs 2019.

The Demon’s Head

Video length - 08.29
Published date - Oct 2018
Keystage(s) - 2 and 3
Downloadable resources

Red Nose Day – Rabecca’s Story – School might feel like a drag after double Maths, but young people all around the world are desperate to get an education because they know it is their best chance of a brighter future. Jamie Laing from Made in Chelsea introduces this short film about Rabecca, a girl from Zambia who could no longer afford to go to school after her parents died.

Donate to Comic Relief here to help people living difficult lives in the UK and in Africa.

Red Nose Day – Rabecca’s Story

Video length - 04.03
Published date - Mar 2015
Keystage(s) - 3 and 4

Sport Relief – Raymond’s Story – In Africa, 1 in 4 children have to work for a living, often in dangerous conditions. Greg James introduces this film about Raymond, a 14 year-old boy who lives in Ghana. Raymond has to work long days in a mine to support his family, but Sport Relief money is providing him with an education to help him escape poverty and achieve his ambitions.

Do something amazing and donate to Sport Relief.

Sport Relief – Raymond’s Story

Video length - 04.03
Published date - Feb 2014
Keystage(s) - 3 and 4

My Mum – What does your mum do for you? Whether you’re young or old, mums play a huge part in our lives – so here are just a few tributes from members of the public.

My Mum

Video length - 1.57
Published date - Feb 2013
Keystage(s) - 3 and 4
Downloadable resources