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Holy Cribs: The Gurdwara

Arvinda Singh, a young Sikh, gives TrueTube a tour of his Gurdwara, the Sri Guru Singh Sabha in Southall. He shows us the prayer hall, the dining hall and even the Guru Granth Sahib’s bedroom!

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices - Sikhism - The nature of God linked with the worship of God in Sikhism. The Mool Mantra and how Sikhs pray and meditate mainly at home. Worship in the gurdwara The features of the gurdwara and its role in the Sikh community. To study the building’s design and function and identify the main features, external and internal. Worship in the Gurdwara - This covers how Sikhs show their respect when they are in the presence of the Guru Granth Sahib. The Langar -This covers the practice of eating together. It links the topics about equality, sewa and the gurdwara together.
Area of study 2 - Section 3: Living the Sikh Life - Sikhism - Features of the gurdwara: the nature, history and purpose of the design of the Gurdwara as the ‘Door/Gate of the Guru’, including Rahit Maryada Chapters 4–6; how and why objects of devotion are used within the gurdwara: Guru Granth Sahib, Takht, Chanani, Chaur, the langar hall, four doors, and the Nishan Sahib; divergent understandings of the importance of these features in Sikh life today. The gurdwara: the role and importance of the gurdwara within the Sikh community including reference to Guru Granth Sahib 1391; activities that take place within the gurdwara and why; the nature and importance of visiting Sikh historical gurdwaras: the Harmandir Sahib in Amritsar (the Golden Temple); divergent understandings of the importance of making such visits including reference to Guru Granth Sahib 4. Langar: the history of langar including Guru Granth Sahib 967; the nature and purposes of langar; the significance of langar for Sikhs today, especially as an expression of sewa.
2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Sikhism - Core beliefs, teachings and practices - Practices Worship  Features of the gurdwara  Role of Guru Granth Sahib in worship  Features of service; role of granthi and epilogue  Distribution of karah prashad  Role of langar in the gurdwara – concept of equality and selfless service (Guru Granth Sahib 349).
Component 3 (Route A) -Option 5: Sikhism - Practices: The gurdwara: practices in Britain and elsewhere ➢ The importance and the role of Bhatra and Ramgarhia gurdwaras in Britain as places of worship, social and community functions ➢ Religious features: artefacts, Guru Granth Sahib, langar (as an expression of sewa - selfless service to others) and associated practices Worship ➢ The role and importance of prayer in the home ➢ Significance of the practice of meditating on the name of God
Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices - Sikhism - The nature of God linked with the worship of God in Sikhism. The Mool Mantra and how Sikhs pray and meditate mainly at home. Worship in the gurdwara The features of the gurdwara and its role in the Sikh community. To study the building’s design and function and identify the main features, external and internal. Worship in the Gurdwara - This covers how Sikhs show their respect when they are in the presence of the Guru Granth Sahib. The Langar -This covers the practice of eating together. It links the topics about equality, sewa and the gurdwara together.
Area of study 2 - Section 3: Living the Sikh Life - Sikhism - Features of the gurdwara: the nature, history and purpose of the design of the Gurdwara as the ‘Door/Gate of the Guru’, including Rahit Maryada Chapters 4–6; how and why objects of devotion are used within the gurdwara: Guru Granth Sahib, Takht, Chanani, Chaur, the langar hall, four doors, and the Nishan Sahib; divergent understandings of the importance of these features in Sikh life today. The gurdwara: the role and importance of the gurdwara within the Sikh community including reference to Guru Granth Sahib 1391; activities that take place within the gurdwara and why; the nature and importance of visiting Sikh historical gurdwaras: the Harmandir Sahib in Amritsar (the Golden Temple); divergent understandings of the importance of making such visits including reference to Guru Granth Sahib 4. Langar: the history of langar including Guru Granth Sahib 967; the nature and purposes of langar; the significance of langar for Sikhs today, especially as an expression of sewa.
2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Sikhism - Core beliefs, teachings and practices - Practices Worship  Features of the gurdwara  Role of Guru Granth Sahib in worship  Features of service; role of granthi and epilogue  Distribution of karah prashad  Role of langar in the gurdwara – concept of equality and selfless service (Guru Granth Sahib 349).
Component 3 (Route A) -Option 5: Sikhism - Practices: The gurdwara: practices in Britain and elsewhere ➢ The importance and the role of Bhatra and Ramgarhia gurdwaras in Britain as places of worship, social and community functions ➢ Religious features: artefacts, Guru Granth Sahib, langar (as an expression of sewa - selfless service to others) and associated practices Worship ➢ The role and importance of prayer in the home ➢ Significance of the practice of meditating on the name of God

Holy Cribs: Gurdwara

Arvinda: Sat sri akal ji! Welcome to Sri Guru Singh Sabha Southall! My name is Arvinda Singh and I'm a Sikh. Our religion is often called Sikhism, but we like to call it Sikhi. This is the Gurdwara. This is our holy building where we come to worship Waheguru, which is the name of God. I'm going to give you a tour now. Just before we go inside, I want to show you the Nishan Sahib. This is a special flag in front of every Gurdwara. This is usually yellow or orange in colour and has a blue symbol on it called the Khanda.

 

Right then. Come on in.

 

The first thing we do is cover our heads. A lot of Sikhs, especially men, wear a dastar or a turban, but everyone else wears a headscarf such as these. We also take our shoes off and put them in the shoe rack. The last thing we do is wash our hands. This is a sign of respect, but we will need clean hands later because there will be food. The word Gurdwara means door to the Guru in Punjabi, it is where we come to pay our respects to Waheguru and our holy book the Guru Granth Sahib ji. We cover our hair, take our shoes off and wash our hands as a sign of respect. The main part of the Gurdwara where we listen to the Guru Granth Sahib ji is called the diwan hall or the prayer hall. But we'll need to be very quiet. The Guru Granth Sahib ji is treated like royalty, it sits at the front on a raised platform called the takht, which means throne. The canopy above it is called a palki. And the cushion it rests on is called a manji sahib. When we come here, we always pay our respects to the Guru Granth Sahib ji. We walk down to the front, bow and maybe give an offering. It's usually money, but it can be food or a new cloth to wrap the Guru Granth Sahib ji in when it isn't being read. Some people like to walk clockwise around the takht as a symbol that the Guru Granth Sahib ji, is a centre part of their lives. Then being careful not to turn our backs to the Guru until we are a little distance away, we go and sit down. Everyone sits on the floor as a sign of equality. Men sit on one side, usually the right, women on the other side. This is so that we are concentrating on Waheguru and the words of the Guru Granth Sahib Ji and not on each other. Services can go on for hours, so people often come and go as they like. There's no particular day for worship. The Gurdwara is open every day, but it gets crowded on a Sunday when most people are off work. Mostly we sit and listen to the words of the Guru Granth Sahib Ji. The person reading it is called a granthi. The granthi isn't a priest and can be any man or woman who can read Gurmukhi. That's the Punjabi alphabet and it was used to write the Guru Granth Sahib Ji, because Sikhi began in Punjab in the north of India.

 

As the granthi reads, he or she waves a fan made of hair or feathers called a chauri. In India, important people will be fanned to keep them cool and to keep flies off them. It became a symbol of respect even when it isn't hot. So now it's done for the Guru Granth Sahib Ji. Every day the granthi gives a special reading called a hukam. He or she opens the Guru to whichever page it falls open and reads the words. The idea is that this isn't random. Waheguru chooses which words are most suitable for people to hear. Sometimes we have musicians called ragis who sing hymns called bhajans. And often these words come from the Guru Granth Sahib ji. Singing hymns like this is called kirtan. The drums are called tabla, and the keyboard is called a vaja or harmonium in English and works by pumping air through it by hand.

Arvinda  At the end of the service, everyone stands to say a special prayer together called the Ardas. There's always a big bowl of karah parshad. This is a sweet porridge made with lots of sugar and butter. It is a symbol of Waheguru ji's blessings as everybody shares from the same bowl. And it's very delicious.

 

Gurdwaras are often very beautifully decorated. This symbol the Khanda, was the one on the Nishan Sahib outside. And this is Gurmukhi writing. It says Ik Onkar, which means there is only one God. And those are the very first words of the Guru Granth Sahib ji. Those words were written by Guru Nanak dev ji. He was the very first leader of the Sikhs beginning in the year 1500, and he was given the title Guru, which means teacher, Sikh means pupil. There were ten Gurus in all who led the Sikhs, one after the other for about 200 years. Then the last Guru, Guru Gobind Singh ji, said that after his death, the writings of the first five Gurus and the ninth Guru would become the 11th and final Guru, the Guru Granth Sahib ji, which is why we give it so much respect. The Guru Granth Sahib even has its own room with a bed where it's kept overnight when it isn't being read. Gurdwaras have other rooms that could be used for community activities like this library. And every Gurdwara has one of these: a Langar or a dining hall. Anyone and everyone can share a free meal here. This is another symbol of equality. Back in the day in India, upper class people wouldn't mix with working class people and definitely wouldn't eat with them. So Guru Nanak dev ji started the Langar to encourage equality. The food here is always vegetarian so that everyone, no matter what their religion or if they just don't eat meat, can share the same meal. The people cooking food, serving it and washing up the plates are all volunteers. We call it seva, doing work to help other people. So next time you're passing by a Gurdwara, make sure to put a headscarf on and come and enjoy a free meal. Thank you for coming to the Gurdwara. Goodbye.

Holy Cribs: The Gurdwara

Video length - 07.18
Published date - Apr 2023
Keystage(s) - 2, 3 and 4
Downloadable resources

Moses and the 10 Commandments – Vlog #1 – The Bible story of Moses and the 10 Commandments is retold – with a twist.

Moses and the Jewish people are on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land when Moses goes to speak with God near the summit of Mount Sinai. Afterwards Moses relates what happened in his most recent vlog to his channel. He says that God gave him ten commandments – or rules to live by – written on stone tablets. Moses describes each of the commandments in turn and goes on to reveal that God actually gave him 613 commandments so there are still another 603 to vlog about!

Suitable for teaching KS1 / KS2.

For teachers’ notes and more: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/assemblies-ks1-ks2-moses-10-ten-commandments-vlog-1/zjqbf82

This film is from the the assemblies collection on BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/primary-school-assemblies-collective-worship-ks1-ks2/zmsnm39

As this film is embedded you will not be able to download it.

The TrueTube team made this film for BBC Teach, so for more resources go to BBC Teach: https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach

The Bible Stories series was commissioned by BBC Teach and produced by CTVC/TrueTube.

A film by Alastair Collinson.

Moses and the 10 Commandments – Vlog #1

Video length - 04.57
Published date - Dec 2021
Keystage(s) - 1 and 2

Holy Books: The Qur’an – An imam, a student and a calligrapher who works in Arabic share their thoughts about the Qur’an – where it came from, why it’s important and how they use it in their everyday lives.

A film by Kim Roden

Created in collaboration with the Advocacy Academy

Holy Books: The Qur’an

Video length - 10.04
Published date - Apr 2018
Keystage(s) - 3 and 4
Downloadable resources

Mary’s Lullaby – If you’re the sentimental type, grab a hanky right now. Here’s a dramatic reconstruction of the Nativity to the accompaniment of a specially composed song. Happy Christmas!

Video footage courtesy of BigBook Media.

The song was written by Jessica Toogood and you can read the lyrics here.

Mary’s Lullaby

Video length - 03.14
Published date - Dec 2014
Keystage(s) - 2, 3, 4 and 5
Downloadable resources

The Resurrection – In the last of three films telling the Easter story, we see the events of Jesus’ burial and resurrection. The voiceover was written and performed by Thomas Hanigan and Daniel Flynn who won TrueTube’s Jesus Christ Voiceover Star competition in 2014.

The Resurrection

Video length - 01.48
Published date - Jul 2014
Keystage(s) - 2, 3, 4 and 5

The Crucifixion – In the second of three films telling the Easter story, we see the events of Jesus’ trial and crucifixion. The voiceover was written and performed by Mia Stoop who won TrueTube’s Jesus Christ Voiceover Star competition in 2014.

The Crucifixion

Video length - 02.15
Published date - Jul 2014
Keystage(s) - 2, 3, 4 and 5

The Last Supper – In the first of three films telling the Easter story, we see the events of Palm Sunday, the Last Supper and Jesus’ arrest. The voiceover was written and performed by Amelia Weaver who won TrueTube’s Jesus Christ Voiceover Star competition in 2014.

The Last Supper

Video length - 02.09
Published date - Jul 2014
Keystage(s) - 2, 3, 4 and 5
Downloadable resources

Bethlehem Bureaucrat – Joseph and his bride-to-be Mary went to Bethlehem to register in a census, but the Bible is strangely silent about what happened when Joseph faced the bureaucrats with his story. This film attempts to fill in the gap.

Bethlehem Bureaucrat

Video length - 2.58
Published date - Nov 2013
Keystage(s) - 3, 4 and 5
Downloadable resources

How Islam began in under ten minutes? Not a problem. The turbulent tale is told against the clock, with all the names, dates and events on a timeline. Animation by Ceiren Bell.

TrueTube films are designed for use in a number of ways. Some ideas of where this film could link to your curriculum are below:

 

AQA

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teachings and practices- Islam - Practices, Duties and Festivals. Tawhid - (the Oneness of God), Qur’an Surah 112 Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah including origins, how Hajj is performed, the actions pilgrims perform at sites including the Ka’aba at Makkah, Mina, Arafat, Muzdalifah and their significance.

 

Edexcel

Area of Study 1- Islam - Section 1: Muslim Beliefs - Islam - The nature of Allah: how the characteristics of Allah are shown in the Qur’an and why they are important: Tawhid (oneness), including Surah 16: 35–36, immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice, Adalat in Shi’a Islam.
Section 3: Living the Muslim Life - Islam Hajj as one of the Five Pillars: the nature, role, origins and significance of Hajj, including Surah 2: 124–130; 22: 25–30; how Hajj is performed and why Hajj is important for Muslims; benefits and challenges from attending Hajj for Muslims."
OCR
Componet Group 2–Religion, philosophy and ethics in the modern world from a religious perspective - the existence of God, gods and ultimate reality, and ways in which God, gods or ultimate reality might be understood; through revelation, visions, miracles or enlightenment. Component Group 1–Practices - Islam - Public acts of worship - Salah as direct communication with Allah. The importance of practices - Islam as a way of life, lived in total submission to Allah • The importance of the Five Pillars of Islam to Sunni Muslims • The meaning of the Five Pillars: •• Shahadah: sincerely reciting the Muslim profession of faith •• Salat: performing ritual prayers in the proper way five times each day •• Zakat/Zakah: paying an alms (or charity) tax to benefit the poor and the needy •• Sawm: fasting during the month of Ramadan •• Hajj: pilgrimage to Mecca • The analogy of the house and pillars
WJEC
2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Part A - Islam - Core beliefs, teachings and practices - Beliefs - The Nature of God  Allah as one God: Tawhid (Qur'an 3:18)  The qualities of Allah in the Qur'an; e.g. immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, beneficence, merciful (Qur'an 46:33), the 99 names of Allah  The meaning of Islam as 'submission' to Allah and how Muslims live a life in submission to the will of Allah, including the importance of Greater Jihad  Shahadah as a statement of faith in Allah, shirk as sin against Allah  Reasons for the prohibition of images of Allah or any human figure
Eduqas
Component 3 (Route A): Study of a World Faith: Option 3: Islam:The Nature of Allah ➢ The teaching about the nature of Allah: the belief in the oneness of Allah (Tawhid): Qur'an 3:18 ➢ Nature of Allah: immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice: Qur'an 46:33 ➢ Adalat in Shi'a Islam Prophet hood (Risalah) ➢ The nature of prophet hood; why are prophets important? Qur'an 2:136 ➢ The importance of Adam as the first prophet ➢ Ibrahim as father of Isaac and Ishma'il and his significance for the Muslim religion ➢ Isa as a prophet for Muslims: Qur'an 2:87 ➢ Muhammad as the seal of the Prophets Angels (Malaikah) ➢ The significance of angels in Islam: Qur’an 2:97-98,Qur’an 2:285 ➢ Diversity in belief between Shi’a and Sunni Muslims regarding angels and free will ➢ The significance of Jibril's revelation of the Qur'an to Muhammad: Qur’an 2:97-98 ➢ The significance of Mika'il placed in charge of plants and rain ➢ The significance of Israfil to announce the Day of Resurrection Akhirah (Afterlife) ➢ Al-Qadr (Predestination):Implications for human freedom ➢ Akhirah: Human responsibility and accountability; Muslim beliefs and teachings about the afterlife ➢ Human Freedom and its relationship to Day of Judgement ➢ Heaven; Muslim beliefs about the nature, stages and purpose of heaven ➢ Hell; Muslim beliefs about the nature and purpose of hell. Festivals and commemorations: practices in Britain and elsewhere ➢ Id-ul-Adha: The festival of sacrifice. How Muslims celebrate IdulAdha in Britain and worldwide ➢ Id-ul-Fitr: The festival of fast-breaking following Ramadan. How Muslims celebrate Id-ul-Fitr in Britain and worldwide ➢ Ashura: The Day of Remembrance (Shi'a). How Shi'a Muslims celebrate Ashura in Britain and worldwide ➢ The Night of Power: the importance of the revelation of the Qur'an and how it is viewed and treated in Islam

How Islam Began – In Ten Minutes

How Islam began in under ten minutes. Not a problem. We've started. Okay, so travel back in time with me to a land far, far away. And long, long ago. Mecca and Arabia, but the year 570. Makkah is important for two reasons. One, the Kaaba is there, an ancient temple built to worship God, and two, Muhammad, peace be upon him, was born in Makkah. Now, problem, I can't show you Muhammad because it wouldn't be right. I'll tell you why in a bit, but in the meantime, here's his name in Arabic. Nice.

Back in the day, Makkah was a lawless place. The only way to be safe was to have backup. Lots of rich big brothers who'd beat up anyone who got in your way. So the place was ruled by the most powerful families who could do pretty much what they wanted. And religion didn't help. By this time, the Kaaba had been filled to overflowing, with 360 idols that did nothing to help anyone. So it was a tough place to grow up if, like Muhammad, you were a poor orphan and believed in just one God you couldn't see, like the Jews and the Christians. He called him Allah, the God, in Arabic there.

Muhammad's dad died before he was even born, and his mom died when he was just six. So he was brought up by his grandfather, Abdul Muttalib. And then when he died too, by his uncle Abu Talib, who had the respect of the city's ruling families, so Muhammad was safe, for the time being. Muhammed started out as a shepherd and then became a businessman, travelling about, buying and selling stuff for rich clients. When he did some work for a rich widow called Khadijah, she was so impressed by his honesty and skill that they ended up getting married, and for a while it looked like Mohammed was going places, well he was, but not how you think.

Every year in the month of Ramadan, different calendar, different names for the months, there was a big party around the Kaaba. When people made sacrifices to the idols, Mohammed hated it, so he'd get out of town and sleep in a cave he'd found on top of a nearby mountain. One night, Mohammed's praying to Allah when, wham, there's the angel Jibril, you might say Gabriel, standing right in front of him. 'Read' says the angel, but Mohammed couldn't read, no schools, you see, Jibreel keeps on at him. Three times he says 'read'. Then he grabs hold of Muhammad and wham! Again, it's like Muhammad's learnt the words off by heart. So he recites the message out loud, read in the name of your Lord, who created man from a drop of blood. Read, for your Lord is most generous. He who taught by the pen taught man what he did not know. It was a message from Allah. God was speaking to him just like he'd spoken to the prophets in the Jewish and Christian holy books, which meant he was a prophet too.

The messages continue for the rest of Muhammad's life. Allah gave him the words to say and the prophet recited them. The words were written down by his friends, and years later they were collected together and became the Muslim holy book, the Qur'an, which means recitation because Muhammad recited it, you see. Anyway, that was much later, so back to the night of power. Muhammad tells his family, then his friends, and eventually everyone about Allah that he's a one and only God, that he wants everyone to be treated fairly, and long story short, it didn't go down well with the ruling families of Makkah, who liked things just the way they were, thank you very much. You see, Islam means obedience to Allah and Muslim means someone who obeys Allah. And the ruling families didn't want anyone obeying anyone else but them. So the people who believed in Muhammad's message, the Muslims, were given a hard time. Some were even tortured and killed. A few of them managed to escape to Abyssinia, Ethiopia, but most were stuck in Makkah.

Muhammad also had to cope with the death of his wife, and then just a few weeks later, his uncle too. Feeling very down, he went to the carpet to pray to Allah one night. Then the weirdest thing happened. Jibril turns up, sits him on a winged horse called Al-buraq and flies him all the way from Makkah to Jerusalem. He prays with all the prophets who have ever lived. Then he's taken up to the heavens to chat with some of the prophets, and then into Paradise itself, where Allah tells Muhammad to pray five times a day and to stay strong. He's returned to Jerusalem, and then flies back to the Kaaba in Makkah. We call it the night journey, and Muslims still argue whether it was a real experience or a vision, but whatever. It gave Muhammad a much needed boost, and just as well, because there were more tough times ahead. So there was this other city called Yathrib. The people there heard about Muhammad and his message and invited him and his followers to join them. A few at a time, the Muslims left Makkah and made a dangerous journey across the desert to Yathrib. It's known as the Hijra, which means migration, you know, like birds do.

Muhammad and a few of his friends stayed in Makkah until everyone had got away, and then made plans for their own escape. But, the ruling families wanted to kill Muhammad while they still could, so seven sons, one from each family, was sent in the middle of the night to stab the prophet while he slept. But he was way ahead of them, and when they burst into the house, Muhammad was gone. Trackers were sent out to hunt him down. Muhammad and his best friend Abu Bakr took a roundabout route to try and shake off the pursuit, but the trackers were too good and slowly gained on them, so Muhammad and Abu Bakr hid in a cave and pray that no one found them. The trackers found the cave all right, but they didn't bother going in to search. There was no way Muhammad could be inside they thought. There was a spider's web over the mouth of the cave, and a nesting bird at the entrance. He must have given them the slip, so off they went, leaving Muhammad and Abu Bakr protected by a spider and a bird.

Muhammad made it safely to Yathrib, which was renamed Medinat-ul-Nabi, the city of the prophet, but most people just call it Medinah, but Muhammad's worries weren't over yet. There were three big battles between the Muslims and the Meccans. First, the Battle of Badr, when Muhammad and just 313 men faced 1000 Meccan soldiers. Miraculously, the Muslims won. Then, there was a battle of Uhud, which didn't go so well. Some of Muhammad's men disobeyed his orders, and ran off during the battle to evade the Meccans camp, and so the Muslims were outmanoeuvred. Then, there was the battle of the trench. Medinah was protected on three sides by mountains, so when the Meccan forces advanced in the city, the Muslims just dug a deep trench. The Meccans made camp, but the weather was terrible. Pouring rain put out their fires and howling winds blew down their tents. Eventually they gave up, and went back to Mecca. It was all a bit embarrassing. They were losing the respect of the local tribes who were flocking to join the Muslims. So a peace treaty was signed at Hudaibiya, but it wasn't long before the Meccans broke it. Muhammad decided that enough was enough. By now he had over 10,000 men, so he led them across the desert to Makkah. The ruling families realised they'd made a huge mistake, but it was too late. All they could do was surrender and hope that the Muslim army killed them quickly. But Muhammad said there should be no more fighting. He rode into Makkah and went straight to the Kaaba. He circled it seven times anti-clockwise and smashed all the idols, rededicating the Kaaba to Allah, and that's why I'm not going to show you Muhammad. The Muslims wanted to make it totally clear that they only worship the one unseen God, so they didn't have any pictures of Muhammad in case anyone thought he was an idol and they didn't have any pictures of Allah because he's like nothing on earth, so it would be impossible to draw him anyway. So there you go, how Islam began in under ten minutes. How did I do?

How Islam Began – In Ten Minutes

Video length - 8.04
Published date - Sep 2013
Keystage(s) - 2, 3 and 4
Downloadable resources

Passover: Read All About It! – Moses made the headlines for the whole of his life… or he would have done if they’d had newspapers 3500 years ago. So here is the story of the Passover as told by the headlines of the day. Animation by Ceiren Bell.

TrueTube films are designed for use in a number of ways. Some ideas of where this film could link to your curriculum are below:

AQA 

Component 1 - The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices - Judaism - Family life and festivals - Festivals and their importance for Jews in Great Britain today, including the origins and meaning of Pesach.

Edexcel 

Area of Study 2 - Section 3: Living the Jewish Life- Jewish festivals: the nature, history, purpose and significance of Jewish festivals; the origins and meaning of specific festivals, including , Pesach, divergent understandings of why festivals are important different forms of Orthodox and Reform Judaism today.

OCR 

Component Group 1 - Judaism - Practices - Festivals • The origins and importance of Rosh Hashanah, including Teshuva, the Shofar, symbolic foods, the synagogue service and Tashlich • The origins and importance of Yom Kippur, including the connection to Rosh Hashanah, the Book of Life, Kapparah, the rules of Yom Kippur, the importance and nature of fasting, the synagogue services and Neilah •The origins and importance of the Pilgrim Festivals, including the story of the Exodus, the importance of chametz and the Seder meal • The origins and importance of Sukkot, including the building of sukkah and the four species • The origins and importance of Hanukkah • The origins and importance of Pesach

WJEC 

2.1 Unit 1 PART A - Judaism - Core beliefs, teachings and practices -Practices -Jewish identity - Festivals and commemorations: Yom Hashoah, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Pesach; significance, preparation and celebration of these festivals (Exodus 12:14)

Eduqas

Component 3: Study of a World Faith - Option 4:Judaism - Beliefs and teachings - Festivals: practices in Britain and elsewhere ➢ The origin, meaning and celebration of the following festivals among different Jewish communities in Britain ➢ Rosh Hashanah ➢ Yom Kippur ➢ Pesach: Exodus 12:14

Passover: Read All About It!

Fears of a slave revolt are sweeping across Egypt, after census figures revealed that the Hebrew population is growing at an alarming rate.

They breed like rabbits.

Said Mrs. Imhotep in Thebes.

Coming over here doing our jobs for us, something needs to be done.

Pharaoh has unveiled radical plans to deal with the slave problem.

We can't have our country overrun by foreigners, even if we did enslave them and bring them here in the first place. Until further notice, all male babies born to Hebrew slaves will be killed.

Surprise greeted the announcement that Pharaoh's daughter is celebrating the arrival of a baby boy. The princess has named the child Moses and firmly denies rumours that she found him floating in a basket on the Nile. However, some members of the press have noted that the baby.

Looks a bit Hebrew.

Prince Moses wowed the crowds when he arrived to see the completion of a new pyramid, destined to become Pharaoh's final resting place.

I'm sure my grandfather will be very happy here, although hopefully not for many years yet.

Moses has shrugged off gossip about his true parentage to top polls as most popular royal ever.

Prince Moses is wanted for questioning in relation to the murder of Mr. Marina-bay, a slave driver from Thebes. The victim's wife made an emotional appeal for witnesses.

He was only doing his job, but they're saying he was done away with by that Moses standing up for his Hebrew brothers. Cos it's all come out, he was a Hebrew all along, and if his real mother had done the decent thing and had killed him at birth, my hubby would still be whipping slaves.

It is believed that Moses has fled the country and is heading for Midian. Moses, 40, was recently revealed to be of Hebrew descent. As a baby. He escaped the slave cull when his mother hid him in a basket and sent him drifting down the Nile in a desperate attempt to save his life. He was found and adopted by the princess, who unwittingly employed Moses mother to nurse him.

I feel such a fool.

Said the princess.

Today's top of the odd comes from Midian, where a shepherd has returned from Mount Sinai with reports of an ever burning bush in the desert.

It was on fire, but it wasn't burning up, and I heard God talking to me from the flames. He gave me a mission to free all the slaves in Egypt.

Good luck with that.

Moses 80. The disgraced prince who left Egypt following the murder of a slave driver has been sighted in the Hebrew settlement at Goshen.

It's unlikely we'll be pressing charges, said Inspector Ankhesenpepi. It was 40 years ago and our only witness is long dead.

Rumours suggest that Moses is trying to gain support for a Free the Slaves campaign.

Moses met with Pharaoh yesterday for talks about Hebrew rights. However, negotiations quickly broke down after Pharaoh refused to consider even a short holiday for the slaves. The palace issued the following statement.

The economy just will not stand any slackening in production at present. In fact, the slaves work quotas are due to rise in the coming weeks.

A Palace insider reveals weird goings on in government. Moses proved his claim to be on a mission from the Hebrew god by turning his staff into a snake, but Pharaoh just ordered his court magicians to perform the same trick.

The floor was alive with snakes, but Moses snake ate all the others and then turned back into a staff, wild.

Moses warned that if Pharaoh refuses to free the slaves, they'll be horrible consequences for Egypt.

The River Nile has turned blood red, baffling the boffins.

In fact, all bodies of water have turned red and smelly.

Said a health official.

We are advising people to dig new wells and drink only from them until further notice.

A plague of frogs has infested Egypt. Millions of the foul amphibians have oozed out of the Nile to fill the streets and invade people's homes.

Lice are on the loose and the whole country is scratching. Doctors advise a daily bath in asses milk.

It stops the itching, but you might smell a bit cheesy.

As flies buzz all over Egypt. Hygiene inspectors are warning people to check their food for maggots. Only the Hebrew Quarter in Goshen has escaped the recent plagues, fuelling rumours that they are signs from the God of Moses.

Following the unexplained death of all livestock, farmers have appealed to Pharaoh for help.

It's time he listened to us.

Said Mr. Menkheperraseneb.

You go down to Goshen, where the Hebrews live. Have their cows died? No. Have their sheep died? No. That Hebrew God is punishing us because Pharaoh won't free the slaves. Well, we've had enough.

The palace declined to make a statement.

Health officials have issued the following advice to deal with the present epidemic.

Don't squeeze your boils, it will only make them worse. Just dab them with crocodile dung. And when they burst, try not to pick the scabs.

In the worst weather since records began, a violent hailstorm has flattened all the crops that were due to be harvested, but farmers are remaining upbeat.

That's all the barley and flax gone. But we've still got the wheat harvest to come.

The wheat harvest has been destroyed by a swarm of locusts. Only Goshen remains unaffected by current events, leading to further calls that Pharaoh should free the slaves before Egypt starves.

The royal astronomers are at a complete loss to explain why it has been dark for the last three days.

We are at a complete loss to explain why it has been dark for the last three days.

Moses emerged from another unsuccessful meeting with Pharaoh today and went straight to Goshen. There he joined the slave community, who have all returned to their homes for a religious ritual. A Mrs Benjamin described what happened.

Moses told us that every family should kill and cook a lamb. The bloods got to be painted around our front door. My husband can do that. Then we eat the meal together and stay indoors until after midnight. Very strict about that, he was.

Grief consumes Egypt. Every household awoke to discover that their first born son had died during the night from an unknown cause. Only Hebrew homes, identified by Lamb's blood around the doors, were untouched by the tragedy.

Bowing to increasing pressure, Pharaoh decreed yesterday that the Hebrew slaves were free to leave Egypt. However, more recent reports indicate that Pharaoh now regrets this decision. He is mustering an army to pursue the Hebrews and wreak a terrible revenge.

Pharaoh has died in a freak drowning accident, along with hundreds of charioteers, horsemen and foot soldiers. He led his army across the desert towards a Hebrew encampment on the shores of the Red sea.

I saw the dust rising in the distance.

Said Mr. Levi.

Pharaoh's army was coming right at us, and we had nowhere to run. But Moses gets up and waves his staff, and the sea just parts. There was this corridor between walls of water straight through to the other side.

The Hebrews made it across, but the pursuing Egyptians were still in the danger zone when the sea came crashing down, drowning every single one of them.

We're free at last. Just need to find this promised land Moses keeps on about.

Passover: Read All About It!

Video length - 7.51
Published date - Sep 2013
Keystage(s) - 2 and 3
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